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We’ve all heard urban legends and rumors about absurd laws in America, but you can’t believe everything you read on the internet.

Sites like dumblaws.com — which rarely link to states’ current statutes or may misinterpret them — only perpetuate the myths. Yes, it’s illegal for a drunk person to enter a bar in Alaska. No, a woman’s hair does not legally belong to her husband in Michigan. The list goes on.

We decided to undertake some legal legwork and identify the strangest statute still on the books in each state. You might find you’re guilty of one or two violations.

A previous version of this article was co-authored by Christina Sterbenz.

SEE ALSO: Here’s where you can legally smoke weed in 2018

ALABAMA: The City of Mobile may know how to throw down on Mardi Gras, but the use of confetti is strictly prohibited. To carry, manufacture, sell, or handle the party supply is considered an “offense against public safety.”

Source: Municode Library

ALASKA: A person cannot get drunk in a bar and remain on the premises. The statute says an intoxicated person may not “knowingly” enter or camp out where alcohol is sold.

In 2012, police in Anchorage, Alaska, started enforcing the law by sending plainclothes officers into to bars to identify excessively drunk people and arrest suspects, according to ABC News.

Source: Alaska State Legislature

ARIZONA: No one can feed garbage to pigs without first obtaining a permit. You can swap out the trough for a waste basket if the swine are raised for your own consumption.

Source: Arizona State Legislature

See the rest of the story at Business Insider